RSS Feed

Tag Archives: pasta

2017 Recipe Scrapbook

On this frigid New Year’s Eve, I thought it would be fun to document some of the recipes and corresponding occasions that warmed my kitchen (and my belly!) throughout the year 2017.

This year has been challenging, rich, full… then again, I suppose those are some pretty accurate descriptors for LIFE in general and not specific to any calendar year. I’m grateful that cooking has made the year fuller and richer (I think there’s a double entendre in there)!

I hope that this list serves useful to you if you’re looking for some inspiration for the coming year, and please do share your favorite recipes of 2017 in the comments section!

XO,
Ginger

Celebration Meals

mom and me smitten kitchenMy mom and I both gave each other Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and Unfussy New Favorites this year for Xmas. (I credit my mom with teaching me how to cook, and she can thank me for introducing her to Deb Perelman 🙂 ) After driving back from Xmas celebrations in Chicago, I was eager to create a festive mood at home (and make the most of my week off from work) by trying the book’s spiced carrot and pepper soup with couscous swirl, paired with a kale caesar [salad] with broken eggs and crushed croutons:

soup and salad smitten kitchen

Go figure that in my anticipation of the cookbook, I borrowed my mom’s cast iron skillet to make Cacio e Pepe Potatoes Anna from Perelman’s site. Potatoes wrapped with a bow, in my opinion:

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 1.15.19 PM

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 1.36.44 PMIn August, my husband Padraic and I celebrated our fifth wedding anniversary. I made a Jeffrey out of him with Ina Garten’s recipe for Real Meat Balls and and Spaghetti. (I love how Ina is always calling for food to be “real” — “real mayo,” for example. And I love her mixture of snobbery and warmth). You can read elsewhere on this blog about my first attempt with this dish.

When Padraic and I had my parents over for a celebratory dinner, I tried a recipe for sweet and spicy pineapple pork from Rachel Ray’s Book of 10: More Than 300 Recipes to Cook Every Day.

Today, on New Year’s Eve, I’m experimenting with another recipe from the Smitten Kitchen cookbook: artichoke and parmesan galette. I tasted it for you… surprisingly lemon-y 🙂

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 1.53.01 PM

Weeknight Suppers

Quick and Easy Chinese: 70 Everyday Recipes is just plain awesome for weeknight, aka, work night, cooking, because the meals are not only quick and easy, but flavorful and special-feeling. For some reason I lean towards chicken when making chinese food. Perhaps I need to get more adventurous. For now, here are two keepers:

Kung Pao Chicken

Kung Pao Chicken

Lemon Chicken

Lemon Chicken

Back in September, I tried slow cooker pesto mozzarella chicken pasta:

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 2.13.56 PM

Here’s are two more gems from Smitten Kitchen:

Tomato and Sausage Risotto

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 2.47.33 PM

Quick Pasta and Chickpeas

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 2.45.38 PM

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 2.24.30 PM

And… two recipes from Chrissy Teigen’s cookbook Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat  that make for simple, special weeknight suppers:

Lemony Arugula Spaghetti Cacio e Pepe
Thai Beef Salad 

The Pioneer Woman’s Migas is filling AND cheap:

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 2.32.40 PM

I happened upon this yummy recipe for cauliflower-cheddar soup while waiting for a prescription to be filled 🙂

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 2.42.54 PM

And finally, lentils! The theme of the new chapter in my life in which I’m paying out of pocket for health insurance AND paying grad school tuition. Thank God they’re so delicious!!

Fridge-Clearing Lentil Soup
Brown Lentils and Rice with Caramelized OnionsScreen Shot 2017-12-31 at 2.56.11 PM

 

STUFF I MADE THIS SUMMER

I spent the summer querying a lot of magazines, writing a long-ass article about teaching gifted students that was finally published this month, for which I still haven’t gotten paid :/ getting accepted into an MFA program, hemming and hawing over whether to quit my teaching job and then writing what turned out to be a novella-length short story about a comically inept teacher for my workshop class, digging into my role as Aunt G, and cooking like a good ole southern Grandma for large family get-togethers…

Here is some of the STUFF I MADE:

The Pioneer Woman’s Chicken Spaghetti

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 3.05.16 PM

Orange Pound Cake

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 3.21.44 PM

Cristina Ferrare’s Strawberry Shortcake

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 3.28.47 PM

My Great-Grandmother’s Baked Beans 🙂

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 3.35.27 PM

Salty Oatmeal Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 3.47.56 PM

Tomato Feta Pasta Salad

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 3.58.08 PM

Shrimp & Sausage Paleo Skillet Meal

Screen Shot 2017-12-31 at 3.57.41 PM

And a few more for good measure:

Mentoring on Sunday Afternoons

This last category is bittersweet… My mentee, a former resident of Epworth Children and Family Services, is currently “on run” and so we are no longer able to meet. For a few months, though, we filled our Sunday afternoons with cooking and scrapbooking about what we had cooked. When she told me that cooking — and documenting it — was how she wanted to spend our time together, I thought, girl after my own heart!

We did a bit of a tour through Ree Drummond’s The Pioneer Woman Cooks:

Recently, when I received a one-line e-mail from her therapist saying that she was gone, I was tempted to view our time together as “a waste,” thinking back on the volunteer coordinator’s lofty words about how it “only takes one person” to make a difference in the life of a child. What difference could I possibly have made?? I lamented.

Today, and in the new year, if there are any resolutions to be made, I believe it is to withhold judgment about any of my pursuits (or relationships) and do my best to be present in them, living one day at a time. I am grateful for my brief time with a young, resilient 14-year-old young woman. It is enough for me that we had a good time together on a few Sunday afternoons in 2017. And yet… I’m glad that we documented our time together, so that some Sunday afternoon in 2018, I can return to this page, and remember her… and the food 🙂

Cheers to the New Year, to cooking, and to treating time with a little bit of reverence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Flank Steak, Mushroom, Arugula Pasta

Screen Shot 2016-08-20 at 9.03.05 PM

My favorite thing about being finished with the Whole30 is being able to cook in bulk, a few times a week, instead of an ongoing rotation of chopping and dishwashing. So far what that’s meant for me and my husband Padraic has been pasta salads full of veggies and protein. Tonight I tried a recipe from Giada De Laurentiis’s Everyday Pasta that’s a real keeper. Tasty, filling, healthy… Here it is, adapted by yours truly:

Flank Steak Pasta

  • Mince 1 large clove garlic and mix it with 1 teaspoon Herbes de Provence. 
  • Sprinkle this mixture on both sides of 1 lb flank steak and let the steak sit at room temp while you prep the rest of the ingredients.
  • Chop a bunch of arugula into 2 cups. 
  • Chop 1 lb of mushrooms into small pieces. (Clean mushrooms with a damp paper towel — if you rinse them under running water they’ll become rubbery).
  • Whisk together 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar, 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard, 1/2 cup julienned basil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and 3/4 cup olive oil. Set aside.
  • Slice the flank steak into 1/2-inch slices. 
  • Coat a large skillet with olive oil and warm over medium heat.
  • Cook several slices of flank steak at a time, about 4 min on each side. 
  • Bring salted water to a boil in a big pot.
  • Cook 1 lb penne pasta for about 9 minutes (al dente) and drain in a colander, reserving some of the pasta water in a bowl underneath the colander.
  • Add some more olive oil to the skillet, add the mushroom pieces, sprinkle with salt, and cook for 4-5 minutes. 
  • Meanwhile, cut the flank steak strips into bite-sized pieces.
  • Dump the cooked pasta into a large bowl. Add the arugula, the cooked mushrooms, the steak pieces, the dressing, and a generous pour of the pasta water. Mix thoroughly with a spatula.

Enjoy!

 

Going Nuts

Jonas Tana Walnuts CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)I don’t understand people who don’t like walnuts. To me they their woodsy, slightly bitter flavor is delicious, unlike any other nut in my nut-stocked pantry (the amount of raw almonds that Padraic manages to swipe on a single Trader Joe’s run astounds me 🙂 ) As much as I love almonds, walnuts seem special somehow — maybe because I’m more likely to cook something special with them, versus eat them raw, or maybe it’s just because they’re expensive.

As it happens, I recently put 1/2 cup of walnuts to use in Tyler Florence’s recipe for banana bread. I’d wager that most avid home cooks have a go-to recipe for banana bread, and recently this has become mine, after years of following my great-grandmother’s handwritten recipe. (Her’s includes a hearty helping of bisquick, which makes me smile.) Tyler Florence’s is a bit more subtle, dividing the 4 bananas into 2 batches — the first is whipped with sugar to form a “banana cream” as the foundation for the rest of the batter, while the remaining 2 bananas are mashed into a chunky purée to be folded in at the end. The result is an especially sweet, moist, and light cake enhanced, of course, by the addition of warm, toasted WALNUTS.

Speaking of walnuts, let’s pause for a moment to ponder these infinitely adaptable blondies — except that I think I’ve landed upon the best version, and it involves a rich combination of almond extract, toasted walnuts, and chocolate chips. Here’s the breakdown:

Blondies
Adapted from Smitten Kitchen

Ingredients

8 tablespoons butter, melted
1 cup brown sugar
1 large egg
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
Pinch salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup walnuts
1 cup chocolate chips

Tools

Square baking pan
Large spatula
Mixing bowls
Measuring cups
Measuring spoons

  • Grease a square baking pan and preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Stir together the melted butter and brown sugar.
  • Stir in the large egg, the almond extract, and the salt.
  • Stir in the all-purpose flour until just combined.
  • Chop, measure, and toast the walnuts, folding them into the batter along with the chocolate chips.*
  • Bake for 20-25 minutes. Gooey is good 🙂

*Adding a tablespoon of flour to the walnuts and chocolate chips helps evenly distribute them, preventing them from sinking to the bottom.

I’ll make this my last mention in this little walnut eulogy — and guess what, it’s not a baked good. Far better, it’s a one-bowl pasta dinner with a sauce predicated entirely on the combination of toasted walnuts, butter, olive oil,  heavy cream, and Parmesan cheese. The result is a subtle, buttery taste with a distinctive walnut flair. I wrote out the entire recipe below, only to realize that I’d already posted it on my blog. I guess I just love it that much. Enjoy 🙂

The Magic of Eggs and the Seduction of Cheese

Screen Shot 2013-12-15 at 12.58.56 PMThe title of this post is not mine, cheese-lover and egghead though I may be (actually, I’m a far cry from an egghead, just looking for an easy pun there). No, this enthusiastic quip hails from Judith Jones, food editor extraordinaire, titling a chapter in her book,The Pleasures of Cooking for One. As mentioned here, her recipes and general philosophy toward cooking with equal parts gusto and frugality also provide an excellent blueprint for couples, or two-party households. To kick off the last week before Christmas, I thought I’d take a cue from Judith and contribute my own take on the holly jolly with two everyday recipes that accomplish something special via a little grated Parmesan and beaten egg whites. As much as I love colored lights, bearded gnomes, and piles of pure driven snow, I believe that the magic of the holidays is inextricably linked with — what else? — “the magic of eggs and the seduction of cheese.”

Cheesy Pasta with Walnut Sauce

Screen Shot 2013-12-15 at 1.06.14 PMI first discovered this recipe a few years ago in Giada De Laurentiis’s Everyday Pasta, and I hadn’t made it for a while until I gave it a go last night. How does this fit into the “seduction of cheese”? Because cheese allows you to do things like make a dinner out of walnuts. I love walnuts but I suppose you could make it with anything — almonds, pistachios, hazelnuts — it was a bit of a revelation for me in the frugality department because aside from half-and-half, I usually have the ingredients lying around, or some sufficient substitution (milk would do for the half and half and you could swap out whatever dried herbs you have). I also love that it’s a true sauce and not a pesto, and in that sense it’s a new way of thinking about making pasta with nuts — it’s sort of like you’re making a pesto and then adding pasta water and cream to make it a warm sauce. The original recipe calls for rotelli (those short spirals) but I happened to buy some purdy tagliatelle at Trader Joe’s last weekend. (Original recipe also calls for heavy cream and parsley instead of rosemary, if you want to give that combo a try.) I feel like tagliatelle makes things elegant for a cosy Sat night at home with my husband, and I think the “woody” rosemary pairs well with walnuts.

Ingredients

  • 16 oz. bag of egg noodles, such as tagliatelle
  • 2 T. butter
  • 1 1/2 cup toasted walnuts
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 3/4 c. olive oil
  • 1/2 cup hard, nutty cheese (Parm or Asiago)
  • 1/2 cup half-and-half, warmed
  • Chopped rosemary
  • Reserved pasta water

Prep Pasta and Walnuts

Set pasta water to boil; meanwhile, toast walnuts for 2-3 minutes in a warm, dry skillet over medium-low heat.

Make the Sauce

In a food processor fitted with a steel blade, combine walnuts, butter, salt and pepper until a paste forms. Slowly pour in olive oil as you mix to combine. Pour into a small bowl and stir in the cheese and half-and-half.

Pull it Together

Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain and reserve the pasta water. Toss the pasta with a drizzle of olive oil and add the sauce, ladling on the pasta water as much as needed to fully coat the noodles and achieve desired thickness. Sprinkle with chopped rosemary or another herb of your choice.

Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

Screen Shot 2013-12-15 at 1.11.59 PMThe story behind my lemon ricotta pancake experiment — in other words, the magic of egg whites — also involves an at-home date with my “hubby,” if you will. I made these (from Williams & Sonoma’s Essentials of Breakfast and Brunch) for brunch on his birthday and, as a testament to how good and easy these are, these little flapjacks wound up being his birthday cake. Sadly, they far outshined my attempt at a blueberry pie (with my typical humility, let me assure you that pie is usually my thing and I blame it on my husband’s request for something intended to be eaten in July — I probably botched the use of frozen berries, I used a different recipe for crust and I tried to transport it to an Irish pub and then realized it was supposed to cool for several hours first — the thing was a half-baked, dribbly mess. But who cares? My sister-in-law was kind enough to bring cupcakes :)) Back to flapjacks. I think it’s great when ricotta cheese, lemon zest, and whipped egg whites turns something worthy of Denny’s into something worthy of, I dunno, Dennaes. It gives you a little lift, literally and figuratively speaking.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups buttermilk
  • 2 large eggs, separated
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup ricotta cheese
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest
  • 2 teaspoons unsalted butter, melted
  • Berries tossed with sugar, for serving

Prep the Batter

Whisk together flour, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl. In another bowl, whisk together buttermilk, egg yolks, sugar, ricotta, and lemon zest. Add the buttermilk mixture to the dry mixture and stir until combined. It can be a little lumpy.

Whip and Fold

Beat egg whites until soft peaks form (easiest, in m opinion, with a standing mixer on medium speed, whisk attachment, but can be done by hand). Carefully fold beaten egg whites into the ricotta mixture.

Fry in a Pan

Heat a large frying pan over medium heat until a drop of water sizzles and immediately evaporates. Brush with melted butter. Ladle 1/4 cup batter for each pancake into the pan and reduce heat to medium-low, cooking until small bubbles appear on top, about 4 minutes. Flip and cook until lightly browned on the second side, a few minutes longer.

Serve Hotcakes Hot

If you’re serving a crowd or just feel like being seamless and professional about your homemade pancakes, keep them warm in an oven heated to 250. (Don’t cover or they will get soggy.) Or be like me and microwave them as needed. The recipe makes about 16, 4-inch pancakes.

Screen Shot 2013-12-15 at 1.19.47 PMIf this wasn’t enough to seduce you, allow me to elaborate my thoughts on all this mildly caloric magic in “What Can I Make With Flour, Eggs, Pasta Sauce & Cheese”? Either way, I wish you a merry week of Christmas preparations or post-Hanukkah chillin.’ I think it would be cosy and merry if we all waited out Advent in a pared down, pile-of-grated-cheese, pillow-of-freshly-beaten egg whites kind of way, and called it Christmas magic.

[Photos: “Eggs,” paul goyette’s photostream, “Tagliatelle!”, Sebastian Mary’s photostream, “Lemon Ricotta Pancakes II,” Patent and the Pantry’s photostream, “Grated Parmesan,” FoodMayhem.com’s photostream]

 

Midnight Pasta + American Nostalgia

Screen Shot 2013-06-18 at 12.37.05 PMIn Not For Bread Alone: Writers on Food, Wine, and The Art of Eating, distinguished authors such as Joyce Carol Oates and Wendell Berry discuss food-related topics with the same intelligent, playful, and occasional dark voices that characterizes their literary work.

I particularly like the essay by Joyce Carol Oates, “Food Mysteries.” She sticks to her signature tone — wry and unsentimental — avoiding the nostalgia trap. Through a collection of anecdotes including her Hungarian grandmother, cafeteria food, and dinners with poets, she manages to translate ironic food observations into a genuinely compelling portrait of human nature, and its mysteriousness. One observation comments on “American nostalgia.” She writes,

“There are adults of middle age in whom the sudden acrid smells of cafeteria food (scorched macaroni-and-cheese casserole, canned spaghetti with tomato sauce, grease-encrusted french fries, ‘beef doves,’ ‘shepherd’s pie,’ ‘Texas hash,’ et al) galvanize taste buds dormant since eighth grade, with a hungry violence rarely experienced since eighth grade: but it is better not to be one of these.”

Well, ahem, I personally can speak to a fondness for grease encrusted French fries (I wish I could call it nostalgia; my enjoyment probably has more to do with the grease than nostalgic memories of my childhood) but that said, this idea of food nostalgia is  interesting… 

Screen Shot 2013-06-18 at 12.46.52 PMIt makes you wonder: if our childhood taste buds can be galvanized as quickly as our amygdala goes into fight-or-flight, does anyone ever grow up? It’s like the saying, “I learned everything I need to know in kindergarten.” True — but what happens when we smell French fries? Suddenly we’re four-year-olds.

Our nostalgia for certain childhood foods hits at the core of human nature. Notwithstanding our biological predisposition toward carbohydrate-rich foods, what about comfort food has us so tightly wrapped around its silver spoon? Like little else, comfort food knows that we never shed our five-year-old selves: innocent, occasionally bratty, and placated by French fries. And it lives to mock us!

Screen Shot 2013-06-18 at 1.01.27 PMFor this reason, I am always inspired by healthier versions of classic, calorie-rich comfort food. I love making old-fashioned  “mac-and-cheese casseroles,” but a quicker, healthier alternative are what chefs call “midnight pastas.” They are improvised using basic pantry ingredients and impart a relaxing, after-your-guests-are-gone vibe.

Here is one of my own, improvised “midnight pastas,” except that I usually make it at 6:00 p.m., and then pat myself on the back for fulfilling the day’s cooking quota, for a crowd of two 🙂

Noodles

The pasta is whatever you choose, or have on hand, cooked according to package directions. I personally think longer noodles are fun, such as linguini, angel hair, or spaghetti. I would cook about 1/2 pound of pasta so you have plenty of sauce to go around. Reserve a cup of the pasta water in case you want to dilute the sauce.

Sauce

This is a hybrid of Barefoot Contessa’s Linguini with Shrimp Scampi (sans the shrimp) and Cristina Ferrare’s Angel Hair with Olive Oil and Lemon from the cookbook, Big Bowl of Love.

Ingredients

Screen Shot 2013-11-02 at 1.44.07 PM

Kosher salt freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 1/2 tablespoons good olive oil
1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic (4 cloves)
1/2 lemon, zest grated
Freshly squeezed lemon juice (1 lemon)
1/8 teaspoon hot red pepper flakes
1/4 lemon, thinly sliced in half-rounds
Freshly grated parmesan cheese
Chopped fresh parsley leaves
Chopped fresh mint leaves
Toasted walnuts, pine nuts, or almonds

  • Optional: add sundried tomatoes, frozen peas, corn
  • Substitute chives, scallions, or basil for mint, or use a different combination of herbs
  • Substitute asiago cheese for Parmesan

Melt three tablespoons of butter and 2 1/2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium low heat. Add garlic and sauté for one minute only. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Remove from the heat and add lemon zest, lemon juice, red pepper flakes, and slices of lemon. Grate as much parmesan cheese as desired over the sauce and stir.

Add cooked pasta to the sauce and mix gently with tongs. Add more cheese and/or dilute with reserved pasta water as needed. Garnish with herbs and toasted nuts.

[Photos: “Cafeteria ‘A,’ 1947,” Duke Yearlook’s photostream and “Homemade Pasta,” marksweb’s photostream]

 

%d bloggers like this: