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“Right Is Right”

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My last post addressed the first strategy in Teach Like a Champion. It also addressed some bloggers’ critiques of Teach Like a Champion and the more broad dilemma between intentionality and authenticity that I personally experience as a teacher.

Despite my appreciation for the criticisms of Teach Like a Champion, I still view it as a valuable resource. So onward and upward…

Technique #2 is called “Right Is Right,” which really resonated with me. This technique is broader and more far-reaching than “No Opt Out,” in my opinion.

“Right is “Right” is essentially having a high standard when it comes to answers that you accept as correct (for me as an English teacher, I’m thinking mainly of class discussions).

Lemov addresses the widespread tendency of teachers to add on to students’ answers, and then to give the student credit for providing a correct answer, instead of questioning students when they provide a partially correct answer until they reach an answer that is 100 percent correct.

In the section, “Hold out for all the way,” Lemov cautions teachers to distinguish between effort and mastery, rewarding effort but encouraging students to build to mastery.

In “Answer the question,” Lemov points out that students learn to skate by in school by providing smart answers to questions that weren’t asked, so it’s important to hold students accountable to the specific question being asked.

In “Right answer, right time,” Lemov encourages teachers to hold students to answering questions in sequence instead of moving ahead, in order to emphasize the process and make sure all students are all learning instead of just one student moving at an accelerated pace. And then, in “use technical vocabulary,” Lemov encourages teachers to get students to use academic vocabulary in their responses.

The whole point of having a high standard for correct answers is to promote rigor and instill confidence and high expectations in your students – in other words, the power to think critically lies with your students and not add-ons coming from the teacher. It’s about showing my students that they are capable of mastering an answer on their own, with the support of questioning rather than add-ons from the teacher.

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